Polished
A polished finish is a glossy surface that is very smooth and the least porous of all the surface finishes. The brilliant colors, depth and crystal structure of natural stone are reflected when polished. The shine comes from the natural reflection of the stone’s crystals and not from a coating. It is obtained through grinding using finer and finer abrasives until the surface is shiny and has a reflective, glossy appearance. This finish reduces the size of surface pores making it less permeable to liquid. At Lesher Natural Stone, Quartz, & Tile we apply a premium stone sealer to all stone surfaces before they leave our fabrication facility.

 

Honed
A honed surface has a flat to low sheen. So, if you think of paint, it's similar to a satin finish. In the granite industry, we call it honed. Granite is honed when the grinding process is halted before the stone becomes shiny and still has the flat to low sheen look. This surface is smooth to the touch with no gloss. Honed stone colors are not as vibrant as the same stone polished. The honed surface tends to leave larger pores than the polished finish, making it a little more susceptible to staining. At Lesher Natural Stone, Quartz, & Tile we apply a premium stone sealer to all stone surfaces before they leave our fabrication facility.

 

Brushed, Leathered, or Antiqued
This finish is not as flat as a honed surface but no where near the gloss of a polished surface finish. Let's say it has some sheen to it. It is not smooth like honed or polished surfaces. It is not rough but has a smooth bumpy texture. This finish does retain more of the stones natural color than a honed surface but at the same time not the vibrant colors you'll see if it's polished. So in summary, it has some sheen with a smooth bumpy texture. Also, please realize that because each stone is composed of varying amounts of different minerals the amount of texture will vary from stone to stone and some colors will not "leather". At Lesher Natural Stone, Quartz, & Tile we apply a premium stone sealer to all stone surfaces before they leave our fabrication facility.

 

River Washed
A river-wash finish can be achieved in several ways. One way the granite is first flamed. This process can only be used on granite and not other natural stones. A flame with extreme heat is applied to the granite which stresses the material making the crystals pop out leaving an extremely rough surface. After that, it is then polished with brushes to smooth the sharpness of the surface. The process takes out some color and makes the surface more porous. This surface has a low sheen and is rougher than the leathered surface. It has a very rustic natural look to it. At Lesher Natural Stone, Quartz, & Tile we apply a premium stone sealer to all stone surfaces before they leave our fabrication facility.

 

Bush Hammered
A bush hammer is a masonry tool used to create texture on the surface of natural stone and concrete. Bush hammers can be elaborate large electric machines or just a simple hand held hammer. Both the points on the grid of the tool are used to repeatedly impact the stone which creates a rough pockmarked texture resembling a weathered rock look. This finish seems to grey out or fade the color of the stone to a greater extent than honing. This finish is rougher than leathering and more uniform. This finish can be done virtually to any stone. It's used mostly for out door applications. At Lesher Natural Stone, Quartz, & Tile we apply a premium stone sealer to all stone surfaces before they leave our fabrication facility.

 

Thermal or Flamed
A thermal or flamed surface is rough and is developed using intense heat. The stone surface is heated using a flame from a torch. The heat from the flame fractures the crystals making them pop which leaves a rough texture on the stone. A flamed or thermal finish is excellent for exterior walkways. Flaming can only be done on granite surfaces. The amount of roughness will vary from stone to stone based on the mineral make up of the stone.

 

Tumbled
Tumbled has a slightly rough texture as well as softening of the edges that is created by tumbling small pieces of marble or limestone to produce a distressed or worn appearance. This is not a typical counter-top surface application, but it is used on natural stone tiles for the floor or back splash.